The derelict afterlives of para-nuclear waste

Becky Alexis-Martin explores the materiality of the nuclear industry in a multi-sited photo-essay Dr Becky Alexis-Martin, Senior Research Fellow in Human Geography at The University of Southampton. @MysteriousDrBex A layer of detritus festoons every abandoned filing cabinet and empty shelf. The fierce midday sun pierces the hazy windows, causing suspended motes to shimmer in the … Continue reading The derelict afterlives of para-nuclear waste

The Elusive Search for Environmental Justice: What We Can Learn from the Efforts of Indigenous Plaintiffs to Hold Chevron Accountable for Its Destructive Legacy in Ecuador

David McRobert[1], Jordan Shay[2] and Julian Tennent-Riddell [3] The Chevron case, which has been called the world’s largest environmental justice case, involves a decades-long dispute between members of Ecuadorian communities and the Chevron Corporation. In 2011 the Supreme Court in Ecuador confirmed the following wastes, all attributed to the United States-based company Chevron-Texaco, had been … Continue reading The Elusive Search for Environmental Justice: What We Can Learn from the Efforts of Indigenous Plaintiffs to Hold Chevron Accountable for Its Destructive Legacy in Ecuador

‘‘Dis Da Fi Wee?”: Oil, Conservation and Development in Belize

Leon Sealey-Huggins, Lecturer, Global Sustainable Development Programme, University of Warwick ‘Fi Wee Belize’ Pickney march tru di street di sing yah dah fu wee Belize mis Matie cross di street di halla yah dah fuh wee Belize even Shiela granny di brokdong to di tune yah dah fu wee Belize but tell mi, weh all … Continue reading ‘‘Dis Da Fi Wee?”: Oil, Conservation and Development in Belize

Lead, Politics, and Community: Notes from La Oroya, Peru

Pamela Neumann, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Tulane University            Lead is a controversial subject in the Peruvian town of La Oroya (population 30,000), which has the dubious distinction of being ranked one of the top ten most contaminated places in the world. Looking out at its scarred white hills today, it’s hard … Continue reading Lead, Politics, and Community: Notes from La Oroya, Peru

“We want to Know what we’re Breathing”: Cement Factories and Contested Environmental Illness in Minas, Uruguay

Dr Daniel Renfrew, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, West Virginia University, USA. In 2011 residents of the small Uruguayan city of Minas (pop: 40,000) identified a disturbing trend. Loved ones, neighbors, and above all, children, adolescents and young adults, were coming down at seemingly alarming rates with various kinds of cancer- “strange cancers,” … Continue reading “We want to Know what we’re Breathing”: Cement Factories and Contested Environmental Illness in Minas, Uruguay