On the Consequences of Chernobyl

Dr Olga Kuchinskaya, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication, University of Pittsburgh The main question about the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident, as historian David Marples puts it, is “how many people did it actually affect through death, illness, or evacuation?” My book, The Politics of Invisibility: Public Knowledge about Radiation Health Effects after Chernobyl, suggests that … Continue reading On the Consequences of Chernobyl

The ‘uncanny’ in Fukushima’s nuclear aftermath: anxiety-provoking attachment to home

Yohei Koyama, doctoral researcher in the Department of Languages and Cultures of Japan and Korea, SOAS, University of London, UK. “I’m afraid to say it, but we love Chernobyl. It’s become the meaning of our lives. The meaning of our suffering” (Alexievich 1997, 215), says Natalya Roslova. She is one of the voices in Svetlana Alexievich’s … Continue reading The ‘uncanny’ in Fukushima’s nuclear aftermath: anxiety-provoking attachment to home

Poetry from Chernobyl

Professor Sarah Phillips, Professor of Anthropology, Director of Russian and East European Institute, Anthropology Department, Indiana University   Professor Sarah Phillips has published several academic articles about Chernobyl, including research on post-Chernobyl food practices and ‘Chernobyl’s Sixth Sense‘.  She has also published two Samotosphere articles on nuclear issues, one reflecting on the 25th anniversary of Chernobyl … Continue reading Poetry from Chernobyl

Mapping the Toxic Remnants of War

Featured Image: A UNEP investigator assesses dozens of storage vessels for the toxic, carcinogenic and explosive missile fuel dimethylhydrazine that were abandoned by Soviet forces at a helicopter and scud missile base near Astana in Afghanistan. Credit: UNEP. Doug Weir, Toxic Remnants of War Project  Armed conflict can generate significant levels of environmental pollution and … Continue reading Mapping the Toxic Remnants of War

“We want to Know what we’re Breathing”: Cement Factories and Contested Environmental Illness in Minas, Uruguay

Dr Daniel Renfrew, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, West Virginia University, USA. In 2011 residents of the small Uruguayan city of Minas (pop: 40,000) identified a disturbing trend. Loved ones, neighbors, and above all, children, adolescents and young adults, were coming down at seemingly alarming rates with various kinds of cancer- “strange cancers,” … Continue reading “We want to Know what we’re Breathing”: Cement Factories and Contested Environmental Illness in Minas, Uruguay

The Petrochemical Complex as a Unit of Reference in Considering Companies’ Relationships with the Local Community

Miguel Ángel López-Navarro, Department of Business Administration and Marketing, Universitat Jaume I, Castelló, Spain My approach to studying the petrochemical industry, from a management perspective, is rooted in an interest in assessing how economic and environmental dimensions interact through the lens of the local community, in a petrochemical complex located in Castellón (Spain) a few … Continue reading The Petrochemical Complex as a Unit of Reference in Considering Companies’ Relationships with the Local Community

The Berdichev Leather Factory in the Wake of the Chernobyl Accident

Professor Kate Brown, Professor of History, Department of History, University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), USA This sentence in a document sent to Kiev a few months after the Chernobyl accident could read as criminal: “In the month of May [1986], the meat factories of Zhitomir, Korosten’, and Novograd-Volynsk processed livestock received from the 30-km zone … Continue reading The Berdichev Leather Factory in the Wake of the Chernobyl Accident